A free, comprehensive, peer-reviewed, award-winning Open Text for students and faculty in college-level courses that require writing and research.

2016 Aaron Swartz Best Webtext Award Winners

First Place
In Literary Criticism: An Introduction, Angela Eward-Mangione defines literary criticism and offers short definitions and examples for a wide array of critical lenses, including New Criticism, structuralism, deconstructionism, and post-structuralism, biographical approaches, reader-response theory, psychological criticism, feminist (gender studies) criticism, new historical/cultural materialist lenses, and Marxist, Ethical, and Post-Colonial critiques. With each approach, Angela provides key terms, examples, and questions to ask; this webtext could help students analyze texts in literature classes or creative writing classes. Angela Eward-Mangione  is currently a full-time faculty member in English at Hillsborough Community College.

The two second place winners
In “Audiovisual Presentations Made Easy(-ier): Tips for Creating an Effective PowerPoint, Prezi, or Keynote,” Jonathan Arnett provides practical advice for developing a presentation. Arnett walks through the use of contrast, repetition, alignment, proximity, color, typeface, audio, animation, and backgrounds. There is also helpful advice on body posture and efficient use of notes during a presentation. This presentation would be incredibly helpful in any presentation class.

The Business Writing section welcomes a new, foundational piece to its collection: Usability and User Experience Research. Written by experienced usability researcher and practitioner Guiseppe Getto out of East Carolina University, this webtext provides a sound introduction not only to the field of user experience (UX) design but moreover to the main concepts undergirding its variegated practices, which rely on a complex series of research methods. This piece is great for readers unfamiliar with the topic of usability who are looking for an overview of its practices and reliable resources to get started.

When is first person point of view used?

First person point of view is often used in personal narrative—when the writer is telling a story or relating an experience. This perspective is writer’s point of view, and the writer becomes the focal point. First person personal pronouns include I, we, me, us, my, mine, our, and ours.

Examples of sentences written from the first person point of view:

  • I was only seven years old when my family moved to the United States.
  • We took a vacation that allowed us to explore our nation from east to west and north to south.
  • My friend and I finally relaxed once we got to the beach and waded into the ocean.
  • How long will it be before our car is repaired and we can continue our trip home?
  • Our ability to construct a convincing argument grew after our participation in a rousing debate.

When should first person point of view be avoided?

Writing from the first person point of view can, at times, weaken the credibility of the writer in research and argument papers. When the paper is written in first person, the work may sound like it is based only on personal opinion.

Weak: I am writing this paper to let you know how bad I think bullying is. (1st person)

Stronger: Bullying is a social issue that may result in devastating physical, mental, and emotional consequences for its victims. (3rd person)

First Person Personal Pronouns

  Subjective  Objective Possessive
1st person  I, we me, us my, mine, our, ours